Congressional Appropriators Finish Work on FY18 Funding

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

The 2018 funding picture for farm energy development programs came into sharper focus after the appropriations committees of both houses of Congress passed fiscal year 2018 agricultural appropriations bills.  However, it’s not at all clear what happens from here.

The Senate bill cut or rescinded a total of $64 million from farm energy programs. Overall, the House bill cut farm energy funding far deeper than the Senate, and targeted REAP in particular. The House cut or rescinded a total of $213 million from farm energy programs. In some cases rescinding funds carried forward from previous years, as provided in the 2014 Farm Bill

Rural Energy for America Program (REAP): The Senate bill protects REAP from cuts in mandatory Farm Bill funding and even adds a small amount in discretionary funding. This comes as a relief given the Trump budget would cut all mandatory funding, plus rescind all carryover funds – which would have been the worst cuts in the history of the program. Historically, the Senate leads in protecting Farm energy programs, including REAP.

The House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee cut REAP from $50 million in mandatory funding to $9 million. Unfortunately, during the full Appropriations Committee consideration of the bill,  Subcommittee Chairman Aderholt sought to cut REAP even further, to a mere $1 (one) million, in a manager’s amendment. This cut would essentially kill the program. However, an error in the amendment the committee passed may spare REAP the second round of cuts. We will continue to monitor the House if this bill moves to the floor after the summer recess.

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP): Appropriations Committees in both chambers capped BCAP, from an original $25 million in mandatory funding to zero.

Biorefinery Assistance Program: Under the 2014 Farm Bill this program did not have any mandatory funding for FY 2018. The Farm Bill, however, provided for funds to carry over from previous years to support the program. There were $178 million in carryover funds in the program’s account. The House Appropriations Committee rescinded all but $31 million while the Senate committee left $139 million in the account.

The next steps in the appropriations process are not clear. Under the regular order of business the bills would go to the full House and Senate and then a Conference Committee would work out differences. At this point the House may be bundling packages of appropriations bills for consideration; the Senate process is moving more slowly. Some  observers expect that FY 18 appropriations will be covered by an omnibus bill (or bills) just as we had for FY 2017 and FY 2016 before that.

 

Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Opens in Kansas

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

On October 17, Abengoa opened up the second commercial scale plant in the country to produce ethanol from cellulosic materials. After decades of technology development, this new milestone offers hope for renewabletransportation from non-food crops.

The plant is located in Hugoton in southwest Kansas and (more…)

2014 Farm Bill’s Energy Title Provisions

Friday, March 7th, 2014

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A Summary of Key Changes in the Farm Bill’s Energy Title

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

(February 11, 2014) President Barack Obama last week signed a Farm Bill after a long grueling process to renew the bill, after the last one ended in 2012. This is the third Farm Bill to include an Energy Title since the first one was established in 2002. The Environmental Law & Policy Center (ELPC) will provide more in-depth resources in coming days but here is a quick overview of key programs.

Farm Bill Energy Title Funding

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New Farm Bill Preserves Core Clean Energy Programs

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Important Energy Initiatives Good for Rural Development, Jobs, Farm Income

After three years of stops and starts, debate and negotiations, the Congressional Farm Bill Conference Committee has released a compromise bill between the House and the Senate that includes mandatory funding for a downsized Energy Title, including the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) and Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP). (more…)

Congress Considers Very Different Farm Bills

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

As the Senate continues debate on the Farm Bill, the stakes are high for a growing source of new farm income, jobs, business opportunities and environmental progress. Farm Bill clean energy programs leverage private investment to tap renewable resources of all sorts from America’s agricultural sector as a new, reliable “cash crop” that increases and diversifies income and creates jobs.

The Agriculture Committees of the House and Senate passed sharply different Farm Bills, with big differences for clean energy progress. The Senate Ag Committee provided funding to continue program operations, although at lower levels, while the House Farm Bill eliminates mandatory funding entirely for energy programs.

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